Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography ARCNL

Postdoc: The onset of sliding friction at interfaces with a relevance to positioning challenges in nanolithography

Unspecified
Save as a favourite

About the employer

ARCNL is a new type of public-private partnership between the University of Amsterdam, the VU University Amsterdam, the NWO, and ASML.

Visit the employer page

Are you interested in simultaneously unraveling the fundamentals of friction and contributing to solving friction-related challenges in computer chip production?

The research field of tribology, devoted to contact formation, friction and wear phenomena down to the atomic scale, is of direct and pressing relevance to the manufacture of semiconductor devices. Friction-induced stresses and deformations on the scale of only a few atomic spacings are starting to challenge the future of nanolithography technology, limiting the achievable feature size in semiconductor chips.

The very onset of sliding is characterized by pre-sliding or partial slip; slip that takes place locally at a multi-contact interface as the tangential force is increased toward the maximum tangential force the interface can withstand before failing. As multi-contact interfaces include junctions subjected to a variety of normal stresses the local threshold for the onset of slip also varies; some junctions may already slip while others remain stuck. In this project, you will perform friction experiments on a recently developed instrument that enables measurement of the very first nanometers of slip induced at multi-contact interfaces subject to normal and tangential loads. The goal of the project is to provide fundamental insight into the pre-sliding behavior, the resulting wear and its impact on positioning accuracy in nanolithography. A variety of experimental and numerical techniques will be used including friction and wear experiments, atomic force microscopy and boundary element method contact calculations.

References:

  1. F.-C. Hsia, C. C. Hsu, L. Peng, F. M. Elam, C. Xiao, S. Franklin, D. Bonn, B Weber. Contribution of Capillary Adhesion to Friction at Macroscopic Solid–Solid Interfaces. Phys. Rev. Appl. 17 034034 (2022).
  2. F.-C. Hsia, S. Franklin, P. Audebert, A. M. Brouwer, D. Bonn, B. Weber. Rougher is more slippery: How adhesive friction decreases with increasing surface roughness due to the suppression of capillary adhesion. Phys. Rev. Res. 3, 043204 (2021).
  3. F.-C. Hsia, F. M. Elam, D. Bonn, B. Weber, S. E. Franklin. Wear particle dynamics drive the difference between repeated and non-repeated reciprocated sliding. Tribol. Int. 142, 105983 (2020).

About the group

The Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography (ARCNL) focuses on the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in current and future key technologies in nanolithography, primarily for the semiconductor industry. ARCNL is a public-private partnership between the Dutch Research Council (NWO), the University of Amsterdam (UvA), the VU University Amsterdam (VU), Groningen University (RUG) and the semiconductor equipment manufacturer ASML. ARCNL is located at the Science Park Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and has a size of approximately 100 scientists and support staff. See also www.arcnl.nl

The research activities of the Contact Dynamics group aim at investigating and providing fundamental understanding of the mechanisms underpinning friction, friction changes over time and friction variability, as affected by wear phenomena, at forces, scales and other preconditions relevant to present and future nanolithography technology. This includes rough surface contact mechanics, adhesion, tribochemical wear, thin film lubrication and novel coatings.  

Qualifications

You need to meet the requirements for a doctors-degree and must have research experience in a non-Dutch academic environment.

Terms of employment

The Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography (ARCNL) focuses on the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in current and future key technologies in nanolithography, primarily for the semiconductor industry. ARCNL is a public-private partnership between the Dutch Research Council (NWO), the University of Amsterdam (UvA), the VU University Amsterdam (VU), Groningen University (RUG) and the semiconductor equipment manufacturer ASML. ARCNL is located at the Science Park Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and has a size of approximately 100 scientists and support staff. See also www.arcnl.nl

The position is intended as full-time (40 hours / week, 12 months / year) appointment in the service of the Netherlands Foundation of Scientific Research Institutes (NWO-I) for the duration of 1 year (with a possibility of extension), with a salary in scale 10 (CAO-OI) and a range of employment benefits. ARCNL assists any new foreign Postdoc with housing and visa applications and compensates their transport costs and furnishing expenses.

Contact info

Dr. B. Weber
Group leader Contact Dynamics
E-mail: b.weber@arcnl.nl
Phone: +31 (0)20-754 7100

You can respond to this vacancy online via the button below.
Please annex your:
–  Resume;
–  Motivation on why you want to join the group (max. 1 page).
It is important to us to know why you want to join our team. This means that we will only consider your application if it entails your motivation letter.

Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis and as soon as an excellent match is made, the position will be filled.

Online screening may be part of the selection.

Commercial activities in response to this ad are not appreciated.

Job details

Title
Postdoc: The onset of sliding friction at interfaces with a relevance to positioning challenges in nanolithography
Location
Science Park 106 Amsterdam, Netherlands
Published
2022-08-19
Application deadline
Unspecified
Job type
Save as a favourite

More jobs from this employer

About the employer

ARCNL is a new type of public-private partnership between the University of Amsterdam, the VU University Amsterdam, the NWO, and ASML.

Visit the employer page

This might interest you

...
Shining a Light on Next-Generation Microchips Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography ARCNL 4 min read
...
The Power of Ultrafast Lasers Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography ARCNL 4 min read
...
Why Does Friction Limit Our Ability to Make Smarter Computer Chips? Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography ARCNL 5 min read
...
Ultrasound Isn’t Just for Babies. It Could Also Help Build a Better Computer Chip. Advanced Research Center for Nanolithography ARCNL 4 min read
More stories